They Were Always Here (2)

As time moves on, fans who once were very prominent may fade into the background, without actually disapearing fully. I do wonder what happened with Trudy Hemken, prolific Weird Tales letter writer of the ’30s, who we wrote about. David Ritter from the First Fandom Experience blog, chronicling the early days of fandom, got in touch with the letter her letter in early ’40 issue of the satyrical ‘zine Sweetness and Light.

Fandom then, as much as now, will have been a collection of cliques and incrowds, while pretending to be one happy family, and with its caricatures of well-known fandom ‘types’ Sweetness and Light would indeed have been “a bombshell in a place of peace.” You’ll no doubt recognise some or several of these types. In her letter, Trudy mentions Esperanto; it’s is a dig at Forest Ackerman. In 1940, Trudy still sticks to Weird Tales, though she no longer feels the need to write.

That year, Weird Tales would see a change of guard, when editor Farnsworth Wright was fired (he died later that year). Dorothy McIlwraith took over as editor and, despite scepticism from Wright-loyalists, steered the financially ailing magazine into profits again. She remained editor in an increasingly tough market for pulp magazines, until 1954 when Weird Tales folded. She was credited as D. McIlraith and readers were none the wiser that their favourite magazine was edited by a woman.

Dorothy McIlwraith. The May 1940 issue was the first to credit her as editor

As Bob Barnett writes (WT 03/51): “Please, Mr. Editor, if you have the say-so, never let the publishers change the make-up of Weird Tales to this modern semi-slick, impersonal, cold and lifeless ideal that others are going in for.” And McIlwraith gamely replies: “The Editor would like to assure Mr. Barnett that he has all the say-so as to what goes in the pages of Weird Tales. Especially this is noticeable when brickbats are flying.”

To adapt or not to adapt? Other pulps went digest or changed their formula. There was a lusty debate going whether Weird Tales should publish only “fantasy” (also including horror) or also science fiction (other than Lovecraftian, I assume). A few months before (WT 09/50), a Morton D. Paley implored: “don’t let those only fantasy fans sway your opinion – plenty of us s-f enthusiasts read Weird too. Keep the science-fiction coming!” Reply: “The Editor is going to be on a spot in nothing flat on this fantasy; s-f discussion. But we hope to concentrate on good stories.”

Membership card for the WT Club, issued to “Tigrina”, a female fan of the early ’40s

Dorothy McIlwraith was not the only woman in Weird Tales’ pages. Of course, there have been several female writers contributing to the magazine, even aside from C.L. Moore. The Tellers of Weird Tales blog identifies 127 female contributors. And then there are, of course, the female fans, who write in to the magazine. In the the March ’51 issue we find, for example, a letter from (Mrs.) Dee M. Groff, “one fantasy fan of 20 years’ standing.” In the May issue of that year we find more letters from women:

Naiia Andreyeff from New York complains about readers who expect their writers to write to order: “Perhaps I’m in a beefing mood this morning (having spent half the night enjoying WT) because being a bit of a writer myself, I’m finding it hard to locate the proper angle for my particular piece of the month. At any rate, I’ve read WT for the past twenty years and am still an adict. In my estimation, the majority of stories in each issue are good. I am a handwriting analyst and have some of Lovecraft’s and Clark Asthton Smith’s handwriting… most interesting.” (She leaves us dangling there.)

“Not ghoulish enough.”

Jacquelyne Miller says Weird Tales is “the Finest Horror Magazine I have ever seen. It is and has been my favourite ever since I first saw it on the newsstand.” However, about the March 51 issue: “The illustrations of ‘Mississippi Saucer’ and ‘A Black Solitude’ were good but I miss Lee Brown Coye. I didn’t care for the cover; it wasn’t ghoulish enough.”

Mrs Alice Law from Dublin has been, since a quarter century, a keen student of occultism, and: “I have been a reader of Weird Tales since 1920, in U.S.A., when I could obtain copies of your magazine. Unfortunately, now, I usually have to wait until I travel to Northern Ireland (Belfast) to procure them, as, no doubt you are aware that many American magazines and other journals are banned in Eire by the censor.”

Mary K. Tieman writes: “I have been reading Weird Tales for I don’t know how many years. Sometimes I can find Weird Tales and sometimes I can’t. But since I made a deal with the lady at the newsstand she keeps my copy especially for me. And I consider myself lucky. I’ve never written a fan letter before but I shall speak as though to a friend.”

In the previous blog there was already mention of a Weird Tales club; something like this indeed happened. I’ve looked through the hand full of Weird Tales issues I have from ’50 and ’51, and several contain a list of new members. There are a fair amount of names in there, which can be identified as women. In Partners in Wonder: Women and the Birth of Science Fiction (1926-1965), Eric Leaf Dean took a sampling: “Of the 448 club members I could gender-identify from these six lists, 118 were female, almost exactly the same gender breakdown as revealed by an analysis of all the letter writers to the magazine.”

Here’s an overview of letters and new members as fractions of totals in the issues I have:

US IssueUK IssueLetters in EyrieWeird Tales club
01/01/48No letters10/33 = 30% (partial list)
01/07/50UK No 61/7 = 14%17/98 = 17%
01/09/50UK No 71/5 = 20%No updates
01/03/51UK No 102/6 = 33%No updates
01/05/51UK No 114/6 = 67%23/89 = 26%
01/07/51UK No 120/8 = 0%12/80 = 15%

There is a curious spike in both letters and new members to the Weird Tales club, and I wonder what caused this. Had women been encouraged to contribute in one of the previous issues? Was McIlwraith making a point by publishing a majority of letters from women in the May ’51 issue? And was she then told by the publishers to stop it? There are no letters written by women in the next issue. It mattered not, as the point was made:women were always part of Weird Tales!

Tigrina (Edyte Edye) reading the Weird Tales issue of May 1945

(RvS)

They Were Always Here

The oldest of the handful of Weird Tales issues we have is dated May 1936. It would have arrived on newsstands and with subscribers in the previous month, and I figure it’s the last one Conan writer Robert E. Howard would have received before his death. I doubt he sat down to read much of it, concerned as he was with the round-the-clock care of his ailing mother.

The Margaret Brundage cover is not one of her more lurid, though it still has a man in a red devil’s costume menacing a pretty girl. Maybe he had a quick glance through; no, nothing of his was printed. Perhaps he read Clark Ashton Smith’s poem Ennui. “Dull ashes emptied from the urns of all the dead, have stilled the fountain and have sealed the fountain-head” No – definitely not in the mood for that; his own well had run dry as it was! Perhaps his eye fell on his own name, in a letter in The Eyrie:
Eleanor Layton, of Washington, D. C., writes, in part: “Howard gets better and better; Conan is superb, magnifique and more! Moore’s characters, Smith and Jirel, are wonderful companions in perilous adventure. Smith and Lovecraft are delightfully productive of chills, as always. Keep Weird Tales up to the mark; detective stories and stories with a natural explanation are not weird.

Catherine L. Moore’s “Jirel of Joiry”

Well-known fan of the time, Gertrude Hemken also writes in. Her letters would appear 32 times in the letter column between 1931 and ’38, sandwiched between a few letters to Astounding and a letter to Golden Fleece. Her career as weird letter writer encountered a full stop via a potato chowder recipe in The Milwaukee Sentinel. About the 5-part Conan serial The Hour of the Dragon she writes:
Conan grows more and more tense in each issue. I almost hate to see it end. But then there is always the promise of more Conan stories in the future…

There’d be no further Conan stories written by Howard though, and only in death did editor Farnsworth Wright give the writer the respect his due, though still not in payment. That, though, could not be known yet by any of the correspondents whose letters we find in The Eyrie.

Irene Pierce, of National City, California, signed herself “an old reader returned.”
Noticed a new illustrator in a recent issue of Weird Tales. He’s very good: as good, in his particular style, as Hugh Rankin. Remember, the poetry, illustrations, and short stories are what kept WT what it has never ceased being – that is, weird.

Lilian Kaltz from Philadelphia dives headlong into fandom:
I have just this moment finished reading Mr. Julius Hopkins’ idea of a WT Club and it is a gem of an idea. I had the pleasure of meeting him in Washington, D. C. and he is most capable for being president of the Washington club. I would like to volunteer my services for starting a Philadelphia club of WT readers. I have been reading WT since a little girl, although I have never subscribed, preferring to patronize the neighborhood store.”

The Weird Tales Club would indeed come into being, and women would be part of it (but we’ll get back to that). Assuming that no women have signed their letter with initials, out of 21 letters in The Eyrie, 4 are by women. They are as knowledgeable as the guys, as enthusiastic and as eager to be involved. And, despite what men from the Manosphere may tell you, they love Conan, and not just to cling to his leg! If we look at Getrude, Trudy Hemken, we see her trying Astounding on for size, but apparently the Church of Campbell is not quite her jam. In Weird Tales she finds a home; over 30 printed letters in 7 years speaks of belonging. She was about 18 when she started writing, and perhaps at 25 life took over. Then again, a letter apparently appeared in issue #4 of the mimeographed satirical fanzine Sweetness and Light in 1940; perhaps to comment on the caricature that had appeared earlier, of “The Fan who has written more letters to the magazines than any other fan”…

In her blogpost on the Flashing Swords! debacle, Angeline already wrote: “Women have always been here.” They have, and they’ve always been active, either visible or behind the screens. Because the blood of a fan creeps wherever it wants to go.

(R)